Custom Glass and Fittings
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Architectural Glass

Toughened Glass

Toughened Glass

Toughened glass is physically and thermally stronger than regular glass. The greater contraction of the inner layer during manufacturing induces compressive stresses in the surface of the glass balanced by tensile stresses in the body of the glass. For glass to be considered toughened, this compressive stress on the surface of the glass should be a minimum of 69 megapascals (10,000 psi). For it to be considered safety glass, the surface compressive stress should exceed 100 megapascals (15,000 psi). The greater the surface stress, the smaller the glass particles will be when broken.

It is this compressive stress that gives the toughened glass increased strength. This is because any surface flaws tend to be pressed closed by the retained compressive forces, while the core layer remains relatively free of the defects which could cause a crack to begin.

Any cutting or grinding must be done prior to tempering. Cutting, grinding, and sharp impacts after tempering will cause the glass to fracture.

The strain pattern resulting from tempering can be observed with polarized light or by using a pair of polarizing sun glasses.

Laminated Glass

Laminated Glass

The most common laminated glass units are constructed with two plies of glass permanently bonded together with one or more interlayers. The most important characteristics of laminated glass are fall-out protection due to the ability of the interlayer to support and hold the glass when broken as well as the reduced ability to penetrate the opening. The ability to resist various kinds of penetration is dependent upon a number of factors including thickness of the glass and the type of interlayer selected.

Laminated glass also offers a greater availability of coatings than monolithic glass. Low-E coatings which cannot be exposed, and therefore cannot be used with monolithic glass, can be used inside a laminated unit where they are protected.

Double Glazed Glass

Double Glazed Units

The most common insulating glass unit is constructed with two plies of glass and one sealed air space. This configuration is a dual pane or double pane insulating glass unit, however is commonly shortened to insulating glass. Insulating glass is used due to the improvement in solar performance it provides. The most significant improvement is thermal performance (u-value) which improves by approximately 50% when compared to a monolithic glass ply. This improvement occurs whether the glass is coated or uncoated.

In addition to the improved solar performance, insulating glass offers a greater availability of coatings. Low-E coatings which cannot be exposed, and therefore cannot be used with monolithic glass, can be used inside the insulating unit where they are protected by the hermetically sealed space. Insulating units also have more aesthetic possibilities than monolithic glass.

Narrow Reed Glass

Narrow Reed Glass

Patten glass used in architectural interior space, bathroom doors and Windows and needed to block the line of sight all sorts of occasions, ultra embossed glass has been widely used in photovoltaic field. The installation can be pattern toward the interior, in order to enhance decorative sense; As a bathroom, shower toilet doors and Windows, glass doors and Windows, the room interval is used

Curved Toughened Glass

Curved Toughened Glass

In another first we combines the strength of toughening with the latest in curved safety glass technology to offer architects, specifiers and interior designers a range of innovative and exciting design options. The continuous manufacturing process involves heating, then curving the glass to the required shape before finally toughening. By employing movable platens in the quenching process, the need for expensive press moulds has been eliminated. This technology allows each shape to be precisely moulded to customer specifications providing cost effective building solutions.

Hard Coat Low E Glass

Hard Coat Low E Glass

Low-e coatings have been developed to minimize the amount of ultraviolet and infrared light that can pass through glass without compromising the amount of visible light that is transmitted.

When heat or light energy is absorbed by glass it is either shifted away by moving air or reradiated by the glass surface. The ability of a material to radiate energy is known as emissivity. In general, highly reflective materials have a low emissivity and dull darker coloured materials have a high emissivity. All materials, including windows, radiate heat in the form of long-wave, infrared energy depending on the emissivity and temperature of their surfaces. Radiant energy is one of the important ways heat transfer occurs with windows. Reducing the emissivity of one or more of the window glass surfaces improves a window’s insulating properties.

This is where low emissivity or low-e glass coatings come into play. Low-e glass has a microscopically thin, transparent coating – it is much thinner than a human hair – that reflects long-wave infrared energy (or heat). Some low-e’s also reflect significant amounts of short-wave solar infrared energy. When the interior heat energy tries to escape to the colder outside during the winter, the low-e coating reflects the heat back to the inside, reducing the radiant heat loss through the glass. The reverse happens during the summer time.. To use a simple analogy, low-e glass works the same way a thermos does. A thermos has a silver lining, which reflects the temperature of the drink it contains back in. The temperature is maintained because of the constant reflection that occurs, as well as the insulating benefits that the air space provides between the inner and outer shells of the thermos … similar to an insulating glass unit. Since low-e glass is comprised of extremely thin layers of silver or other low emissivity materials, the same theory applies. The silver low-e coating reflects the interior temperatures back inside, keeping the room warm or cold.

There are actually two different types of low-e coatings: passive low-e coatings and solar control low-e coatings. Most passive low-e coatings, are manufactured using the pyrolytic process – the coating is applied to the glass ribbon while it is being produced on the float line, the coating then “fuses” to the hot glass surface, creating a strong bond, or “hard-coat” that is very durable during fabrication. Finally, the glass is cut into stock sheets of various sizes for shipment to fabricators. Passive low-e coatings are good for very cold climates because they allow some of the sun’s short-wave infrared energy to pass through and help heat the building during the winter, but still reflect the interior long-wave heat energy back inside.

Soft Coat Low E Glass

Soft Coat Low E Glass

The coating is applied off-line to pre-cut glass in a vacuum chamber at room temperature. This coating, sometimes referred to as a “soft-coat,” needs to be sealed in an IGU or laminated unit and has lower emissivity and superior solar control performance.

Oversized Glass

Oversized Glass

Oversized glass is available in all of our glass products. Please send your specifications and we can provide you with our maximum widths and a quotation.

Glass is used for buildings were a large span of glass is required with minimum mullions or silicone joints.

Here are some projects where oversized glass was used.

Bullet Resistant Glass

Bullet Resistant Glass

Bullet Resistant Glass provides resistance to protect from the threat of firearm attacks to ensure safety whilst allowing excellent daylight clarity.

Glass is used for Police Stations, Banks, Armoured & Defence Vehicles.

Fire Rated Glass

Fire Rated Glass

Fire Rated Glass provides protection to both property and people from heat, smoke and flames for up to one hour.

Glass is used for Fire Escapes & Stairwells.

Fritted/Acid Etched Glass

Fritted/Acid Etched Glass

Acid Etch Glass is a frosted glass used for privacy.

Fritted Glass has a range of screen printed designs to provide privacy while adding a decorative touch at the same time.

Low Iron Glass

Low Iron Glass

Low Iron Glass is a high clarity glass made from Silica with very low amounts of iron. This removes the greenish / blue tint from the glass, enabling the glass to show the true colour or print chosen.

Glass is used for kitchen splashbacks, and printed glass to show the true colour / print chosen

Complete Window & Door Systems

Complete Windows & Door Systems

The complete Window & Door System comes as a Fully Glazed Commercial System available on all window and door combinations including fixed, awning, casement, sliding, and double hung windows, french, sliding / stacking and bi-fold doors.

These Systems are fully certified and comply with all Australian Standards

Nano Coating

Nano Coating

Nano Coating is a protective coating which is applied to the surface of the glass during the production process

The Coating repels water, dirt and contaminates for up to 10 years, it is scratch Resistant, invisible and 100% UV stable

The Coating can be applied to Toughened and Laminated Glass and is great for Shower Screens and Balustrades